Schneider Electric released a new version to mitigate multiple vulnerabilities in its Proclima, according to a report with CISA.

The remotely exploitable vulnerabilities are code injection, improper restriction of operations within the bounds of a memory buffer, and an uncontrolled search path element.

Successful exploitation of these vulnerabilities, discovered by Haojun Hou, Kushal Arvind Shah of Fortinet, Yongjun Liu of NSFOCUS security team, and Telus, could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on the targeted system.

A building and automation control product, all versions of ProClima prior to 8.0.0 suffer from the issues.

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In one issue, a code injection vulnerability could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on the targeted system.

CVE-2019-6823 is the case number assigned to this vulnerability, which has a CVSS v3 base score of 8.8.

In addition, a buffer error vulnerability could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on the targeted system.

CVE-2019-6824 is the case number assigned to this vulnerability, which has a CVSS v3 base score of 9.8.

Also, an uncontrolled search path element vulnerability could allow a malicious DLL file with the same name of any resident DLLs inside the software installation to execute arbitrary code.

CVE-2019-6825 is the case number assigned to this vulnerability, which has a CVSS v3 base score of 7.8.

The product sees use mainly in the commercial facilities, critical manufacturing, and energy sectors. It also sees action in the United States, Europe, and Asia.

No known public exploits specifically target these vulnerabilities. However, an attacker with low skill level could leverage the vulnerabilities.

Schneider Electric released Version 8.0.0 of ProClima and recommends users upgrade to this version or newer.

Click here for more information on these vulnerabilities and the associated upgrade.

Schneider Electric recommends the following best cybersecurity practices for industry:
• Locate control and safety system networks and remote devices behind firewalls and isolate them from the business network.
• Physical controls should be in place so no unauthorized person has access to the ICS and safety controllers, peripheral equipment, or the ICS and safety networks.
• All controllers should reside in locked cabinets and never be left in “Program” mode.
• All programming software should be kept in locked cabinets and should never be connected to any network other than the network for devices intended.
• All methods of mobile data exchange with the isolated network, such as CDs, USB drives, etc., should be scanned before use in the terminals or any node connected to these networks.
• Laptops that have connected to any other network besides the intended network should never be allowed to connect to the safety or control networks without proper sanitation.
• Minimize network exposure for all control system devices and/or systems and ensure they are not accessible from the Internet.
• When remote access is required, use secure methods, such as virtual private networks (VPNs), recognizing VPNs may have vulnerabilities and should be updated to the most current version available. Also recognize that VPN is only as secure as the connected devices.

Click here for more information related to cybersecurity in Schneider Electric’s products.

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